HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL

15th Session

13 September to 1 October 2010

 

 

Agenda item 3

Promotion and Protection of All Human Rights, Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural, Including the Right to Development

Report of the Independent Expert on Human Rights and International Solidarity

 

 

Joint written statement submitted by International Alliance of Women (IAW), the Commission of the Churches on International Affairs of the World Council of Churches (CCIA/WCC), Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University (BKWSU), the International Association of Soldiers for Peace, Zonta International, the International Federation of Settlements and Neighbourhood Centres (IFS), the International Council Of Women (ICW-CIF), the International Youth and Student Movement for the United Nations (ISMUN), the Women’s Federation for World Peace International (WFWPI), Soroptimist International (SI), the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC), Franciscans International (FI),  Civicus (World Alliance for Citizen Participation), International Federation of Business and Professional Women (BPW-International),  non-governmental organizations in general consultative status

 

World Young Women's Christian Association (World YWCA), the Dominicans for Justice and Peace (Order of Preachers), the Federación de Asociaciones de Defensa y Promoción de los Derechos Humanos (España), Interfaith International, Pax Romana (International the Catholic Movement for Intellectual and Cultural Affairs and the International Movement of Catholic Students), the Temple of Understanding (TOU), the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), the Women’s World Summit Foundation (WWSF), the International Federation of University Women (IFUW), the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), the Worldwide Organization for Women (WOW), the Union of Arab Jurists, Rencontre Africaine pour la Defense des Droits de l’Homme (RADDHO), the Foundation for the Refugee Education Trust (RET), the International Bridges to Justice (IBJ), the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children (IAC), the American Association of Jurists (AAJ), the Lassalle-Institut, the UNESCO Centre of Catalonia, the Anti-Racism Information Service (ARIS), the Pan Pacific and South East Asia Women’s Association (PPSEAWA), the International Movement for Fraternal Union Among Races and Peoples (UFER), the International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA), the International Federation of Women in Legal Careers (FIFCJ), the Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW), the International Association for Women's Mental Health (IAWMH), the International Women’s Year Liaison Group (IWYLG), the African Services Committee, Inc., the International Federation of Family Associations of Missing Persons from Armed Conflict (IFFAMPAC), the Institute of International Social Development, African Action on AIDS, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS), the Lama Gangchen World Peace Foundation (LGWPF), the Pax Christi International, International Catholic Peace Movement, the Tandem Project, Canadian Voice of Women for Peace (VOW), the Organization for Defending Victims of Violence (ODVV), Solar Cookers International (SCI), the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH), the United States Federation for Middle East Peace, Network Women in Development Europe (KULU), North-South XXI, the United Towns Agency for North-South Cooperation, the International Organization for the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (EAFORD), Latin American Committee for the Defense of Women’s Rights (CLADEM), the United Nations Association in Spain (UNA-Spain) (ANUE), Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, Maryknoll Sisters of St. Dominic, the International Forum for Child Welfare, the BADIL Resource Center for Palestinian Residency and Refugee Rights, the Arab Lawyers Union, the General Federation of Iraqi Women, the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), the International Association of Peace Messenger Cities, the Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, the Comite International pour le Respect et l’Application de la Charte Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples (CIRAC), the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (CIHRS), the World for World Organisation (WFWO), the Universal Esperanto Association (UEA), the Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW), the Council of American Overseas Research Centres, Zenab for Women in Development, Inc., The Grail, UNANIMA International, Association for Democratic Initiatives (ADI), the Centre for Development Studies and Action, Deniz Feneri Association (Light House Aid and Solidarity Association), the Arab Centre for the Independence of the Judiciary and the Legal Profession (ACIJLP), the Commission for the Defense of Human Rights in Central America (CODEHUCA), the International Association of Democratic Lawyers (IADL), the General Arab Women Federation (GAWF), the National Alliance of Women’s Organisations (NAWO), MADRE, Inc., the National Council of Women of Great Britain, the Centre Independent de Recherches et d'Initiatives pour le Dialogue (CIRID), Guild of Service, Universal Peace Federation, the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), Comision Colombiana de Juristas (CCJ), COJEP International (Conseil de Jeunesse Pluriculturelle), the Association of African Women for Research and Development (AAWORD), the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) (member of the Scalabrini International Migration Network), the World Association for Phychosocial Rehabilitation (WAPR), the Foundation for Subjective Experience and Research, the Institute of International Social Development, the African Women's Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), the Salvation Army, the Planetary Association for Clean Energy, Inc., the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics, International Movement against all Forms of Discrimination and Racism (IMADR), Action internationale pour la paix et le développement dans la région des Grands Lacs, Buddha's Light International Association, Association apprentissage sans frontieres (ASF), Indian Movement "Tupaj Amaru", General Arab Women Federation, European Women's Lobby, National Council of Women of Canada, non-governmental organizations in special consultative status,

 

The Federation for Peace and Conciliation (IFPC), the World Association for the School as an Instrument of Peace, the International Society for Human Rights (ISHR), the Institute for Planetary Synthesis (IPS), the International Peace Bureau (IPB), the UNESCO Centre Basque Country (UNESCO ETXEA), the 3HO Foundation, Inc. (Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization), the Dzeno Association, the Country Women Association of Nigeria (COWAN), the Association Nigerienne des Scouts de l'Environnement (ANSEN), the International Peace Research Association (IPRA), the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD), the International Progress Organization (IPO), the Gray Panthers, the Arab NGO Network for Development, Communications Coordination Committee for the United Nations (CCCUN), nongovernmental organizations on the roster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

 

The Human Right to Peace as Part of the Draft Declaration

 on the Right of Peoples and Individuals to International Solidarity[1]

 

Text:

 

I

 

 

The Spanish Society for International Human Rights Law (SSIHRL) welcomed on 30 October 2006 the adoption of the Luarca Declaration on the Human Right to Peace, which was drafted by a Committee of independent experts. It was the culmination of a process of extensive consultations within the Spanish civil society.

 

On 15 March 2007, the Luarca Declaration on the Human Right to Peace was firstly presented to the fourth session of the HR Council in an oral statement. Since then, the SSIHRL and more than 500 NGO have organized many parallel meetings at the Palais des Nations during the subsequent sessions of the HR Council in order to analyse specific questions regarding the content and scope of the human right to peace[2].

 

At the same time, the SSIHRL has developed its four-year World Campaign on the Human Right to Peace organizing workshops and expert meetings on the human right to peace in all regions of the world [3], sharing the content of the Luarca Declaration, and receiving inputs from different cultural sensibilities.

 

The Luarca Declaration was reviewed in the light of the contributions received from various regional expert meetings on the human right to peace. A new drafting committee of independent experts approved on 24 February 2010 the Bilbao Declaration on the Human Right to Peace[4].

 

The Bilbao Declaration on the Human Right to Peace was reviewed by the International Drafting Committee (ten experts from the five geographical groups), which approved on 2 June 2010 the Barcelona Declaration on the Human Right to Peace based on the interests and aspirations of the international civil society as a whole[5].

 

The Barcelona Declaration on the Human Right to Peace shall be submitted to the International Congress on the Human Right to Peace, to be organized by the SSIHRL in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) on 9-10 December 2010[6]. Civil society shall be invited to discuss and adopt a final text of the Declaration that will represent their aspirations in the codification of the human right to peace. It shall also be invited to establish an International Observatory on the Human Right to Peace within the SSIHRL.

 

Finally, the Santiago Declaration on the Human Right to Peace, which is expected to be adopted on 10 December 2010, shall be submitted to the HR Council in 2011, urging its Member States to initiate the official codification of the human right to peace. This submission will close the four-year World Campaign of private codification on the draft Universal Declaration on the Human Right to Peace carried out by the SSIHRL.

 

 

II

 

            Since 2007 the HR Council is reaffirming the fundamental value of solidarity in 21st century international relations. Along with the UN Millennium Declaration (2000), it states that “global challenges must be managed in a way that distributes costs and burdens fairly, in accordance with basic principles of equity and social justice, and that those who suffer, or who benefit least, deserve help from those who benefit most”[7].

 

            The HR Council also recognizes that so-called third generation rights, closely linked to the fundamental value of solidarity, require greater progressive development in the context of the UN human rights mechanisms, in order to be able to respond to the recent problems posed by international cooperation in this sphere[8].

 

            As a result, the HR Council proclaimed “the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity”[9] and requested that the independent expert on human rights and international solidarity continues preparing “a draft declaration on the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity”[10]. It also requested that the independent expert “further develops guidelines, standards, norms and principles with a view to promoting and protecting this right, by addressing, inter alia, existing and emerging obstacles to its realization”[11].

 

            In his reports to the HR Council, the independent expert, Professor Rudi Muhammad Rizki stated from the first moment that the right to peace shall be part of the future declaration on the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity. In his 2009 report, the independent expert concluded that there exists a principle of international solidarity, on the basis of which can be built a regulatory framework for human rights and international solidarity, as well as for the emergence of a right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity[12].

 

            In his 2010 report the independent expert reiterates that “there is an unequivocal value of solidarity and a related value system that can inform ... the progressive development of .... an evolving right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity”[13]. To his opinion, the international solidarity is “a precondition to human dignity, the basis of all human rights, and a human-centered approach to development”[14]. He concluded that the “international solidarity permeates the three pillars of the Charter of the United Nations: peace and security; development; and human rights. Development and human rights are the most secure basis for peace”[15].

 

 

III

 

 

            In parallel, since 2008 the Human Rights Council has been working on the “Promotion of the right of peoples to peace” inspired by previous resolutions on this issue approved by the General Assembly and the former Commission on Human Rights, particularly the GA resolution 39/11 of 12 November 1984, entitled “Declaration on the Right of Peoples to Peace” and the UN Millennium Declaration.

 

            In 2009 the HR Council reviewed its position by recognizing the individual approach of the right to peace. The resolution 11/4 affirmed  in its preamble that “human rights include social, economic and cultural rights and the right to peace, a healthy environment and development, and that development is, in fact, the realization of these rights” (paragraph 15); that, pursuant to Article 28 of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, “everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms …can be fully realized” (paragraph 17); and that a life without war is the primary international prerequisite for the material well-being, development and progress of countries and for the full implementation of the rights and fundamental human freedoms proclaimed by the United Nations” (paragraph 19)[16].

 

            Additionally, the HR Council reiterated the OHCHR to convene a workshop on the right of peoples to peace, which was finally held on 15-16 December 2009 in Geneva. It concluded that on the basis of studies and latest developments of doctrine and civil society, one might identify the contents and scope of the human right to peace as an emerging right.

 

           On June 2010 the HR Council had before it the report of the Office of the High Commissioner on the outcome of the expert workshop on the right of peoples to peace,[17] as well as the joint written statement of more than 500 NGOs world-wide conducted by the SSIHRL, asking for the establishment of a working group on the human right to peace [18].

 

         The HR Council approved on 17 June 2010 the resolution 14/3, which explicitly recognized “... the important work being carried out by civil society organizations for the promotion of the right of peoples to peace and the codification of that right"[19]; and “supported the need to further promote the realization of the right of peoples to peace". In that regard it requested the Advisory Committee, in consultation with Member States, civil society, academia and all relevant stakeholders, to prepare a draft declaration on the right of peoples to peace, and to report on the progress thereon to the Council at its seventeenth session"[20].

 

         The hr Council resolution 14/3 focused the material content of the draft declaration to be prepared by the Advisory Committee to the right of peoples to peace. However, given that this resolution indirectly accepts the individual dimension of the right to peace[21], it should not be a serious obstacle to preclude in the future to extend the mandate of the Advisory Committee to prepare a draft declaration on the right of individuals and peoples to peace.

 

        On the other hand, the Advisory Committee adopted on 6 August 2010 the recommendation 5/2 on the promotion of the right of peoples to peace, establishing a drafting group of four members to prepare by January 2011 a draft declaration on the right of peoples to peace. After that, the Advisory Committee will distribute a questionnaire to Member States, civil society, academia and all relevant stakeholders. A progress report will be then submitted to the HR Council at its seventeenth session on June 2011.

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

 

            We invite the independent expert on human rights and international solidarity to consider in its future declaration on the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity the conclusions and recommendations of the workshop of experts on the right of peoples to peace, in particular the recognition of the double dimension -individual and collective- of the right to peace, as well as the joint written statement of more than 500 NGOs on this issue[22].

 

I           In particular, the independent expert should endeavour in the future declaration to, inter alia:

 

a)      Consider the human rights to peace and solidarity as a means to foster the right to self determination of peoples and all human rights, including the right to development

 

b)      Recognize the relationship between human rights to peace and solidarity, and rights to life, integrity, liberty and security of the person and the refugee rights; physical and mental health and well-being; the need to protect victims from uncontrolled weapons of mass destruction, genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and ensure redress for their suffering; the need to examine the possibility of disarming all weapons; the right to emigrate and not emigrate; the right to know the truth about human rights violations; the need to protect the rights of the most vulnerable, in particular, women and children; and the exercise of civil, political, economic, social, cultural and linguistic rights to enhance social justice, equity and gender equality, and the elimination of extreme poverty, since it will make possible solidarity, peace and friendly relations among all nations, races, ethnicities or religions.

 

c)      Stress that the human rights to peace and solidarity promote solidarity and education for peace, and the construction of democratic, egalitarian and multicultural societies, as well as the dialogue and peaceful coexistence among cultures, civilizations and religions.

 

d)      Identify appropriate measures to implement the human rights to peace and solidarity as contained in the UN Charter, the UDHR and the international and regional human rights instruments.

 

e)      Take into account the contributions from the civil society as contained in both the Luarca Declaration on the Human Right to Peace –as adopted by the Spanish civil society on 2006-and the Bilbao Declaration on the Human Right to Peace of 24 February 2010 which summarizes the SSIHRL’s World Campaign for the Human Right to Peace (2007-2010), taking into account reports of the expert meetings carried out in the five regions of the world and the regional Declarations on the human right to peace adopted by experts of civil society in La Plata, Yaoundé, Bangkok, Johannesburg, Sarajevo, Alexandria and Havana. (see www.aedidh.org). Finally, the Barcelona Declaration on the Human Right to Peace, adopted on 2 June 2010 by the International Drafting Committee composed of 10 independent experts of the five regions of the world, which granted an international authority to the Luarca and Bilbao Declarations[23].

 

f)        Pay particular attention to gender mainstreaming in the field of peace-building and solidarity as requested by the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women of 1995, and ensure women’s participation at all levels of decision-making on peace, disarmament and security issues, as mandated in Security Council resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 and 1889 (2009), as well as the need to perform a gender analysis and ensure gender justice in all situations of armed conflict.

 

 

 

 


 

[1]     NGO without consultative status that also share the views expressed in this statement: Japan Lawyers International Solidarity Association, Proud Pakistan Belochistan, Monitoring Net of Human Rights In Iraq (MHRI),  The Association of Iraqi POWs, Association of International Humanitarian Lawyers (AIHL), Women's Will  Association (WWA), The Association of Iraqi Jurists (AIJ), Conservation Centre of Environmental & Reserves In Iraq (CCERF), Human Rights Division of  the Association of Muslims Scholars In Iraq (AMSI), Al-Basaer Media Association (ABMA), Studies Center of Human Rights and Democracy (SCHRD), Association of Human Rights Defenders In Iraq (AHRDI), The Iraqi Commission for Human Rights (Iraqi-CHR), The Organization For Widows And Orphans (OWO), The Iraqi Association Against War (IAAW), Organization for Justice and Democracy In Iraq (OJDI), Association of Iraqi Diplomats (AID), Arab Lawyers Network (UK), Iraqi Human Rights Center, Nepal International Consumers Union (NICU), Center for Women's Global Leadership, Spanish Federation of Associations on Defense and Promotion of Human Rights (Asociación para la Defensa de la Libertad Religiosa (ADLR), Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos de España (APDHE), Associació per a les Nacions Unides a Espanya (ANUE), Comisión Española de Ayuda al Refugiado (CEAR), Comunidad Bahá'í de España, Federación Catalana d'Organitzacions no Governamentals pels Drets Humans, Fundación Paz y Cooperación, Institut de Drets Humans de Catalunya (IDHC), Instituto de Estudios Políticos para América Latina y África (IEPALA), Justicia y Paz. España (JP. España), Liga Española Pro-Derechos Humanos (LEPDDHH), Movimiento por la Paz, el Desarme y la Libertad (MPDL), Paz y Tercer Mundo – Mundubat (PTM)), Foro 2010 de Santiago de Compostela (AIPAZ, SOIPAZ, Fundación Seminario de Investigación por la Paz de Zaragoza, Red de Escuelas de Paz de Andalucía, Fundación Cultura de Paz en Barcelona, Baketik, Instituto de Paz y Conflictos de la Universidad de Granada, Fundación per la Pau, Cátedra Unesco de la Universidad Jaume I de Castellón, Igadi, Centro de Estudios Sociais de la Universidad de Coimbra en Portugal, Fundación Galiza Sempre, Altermundo, IGESIP, Institut Català Internacional per la Pau, Coordinadora Gallega de ONGD, Consejo Internacional del Foro Mundial de Educación, Confederación de STE, Colegio de Psicólogos de Galicia, CIP Ecosocial de Madrid, Sociedad Iberoamericana de Pedagogía, Ospaaal Galicia, Seminario Galego de Educación para a Paz, Médicos del Mundo), Hague Appeal for Peace (157 NGOs worldwide, please see in http://www.haguepeace.org), International Peace Bureau (20 international and 270 national NGOs, please see http://ipb.org/i/index.html), Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (32 NGOs worldwide, please see http://www.gnwp.org/), Asamblea Permanente de la Sociedad Civil por la Paz de Colombia (65 colombian NGOs, please see http://www.asambleaporlapaz.com/) and European Women's Lobby (88 NGO worldwide, please see http://www.womenlobby.org/)

 

[2]              On 15 March 2007 both the SSIHRL and the International Society of Human Rights (Frankfurt) convened an open Information Meeting on the Luarca Declaration; on 16 March 2007, the SSIHRL organized a Technical Meeting with NGO and human rights experts with a view to building a common strategy for a world-wide campaign on the human right to peace; on 11 June 2007, both UNESCO Etxea and SSIHR organized an additional parallel meeting on the relationship between peace and solidarity rights; on 12 September 2007, the SSIHRL in collaboration with the UNESCO Liaison Office in Geneva organised a Roundtable on the legal content of the human right to peace; on 21 September 2007, the SSIHRL organised the commemoration of the International Day of Peace in the Council Chamber of the Palais de Nations; on 7 March 2008, the SSIHRL, the International Society of Human Rights (Frankfurt) and UNESCO Etxea organised a Roundtable on the relationship between extreme poverty and the human right to peace; on 4 June 2008, the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea organised a Roundtable on the right to education on peace and human rights; on 12 September 2008, the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea organised a Roundtable on the human right to peace and indigenous peoples; on 19 September 2008, the SSIHRL, UNESCO Etxea and the NGO Liaison Office of UNOG organised the commemoration of the International Day of Peace in the Council Chamber of the Palais de Nations; on 17 March 2009 the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea organized a roundtable on the human right to peace and racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance; on 3 June 2009 the SSIHRL, Women’s United Nations Report Network and UNESCO Etxea organized a roundtable on migration and peace;  on 17  September 2009 the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea organized a roundtable on peace and disarmament as solidarity rights; on 11 March 2010 the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea organized a roundtable on codification of the human right to peace; and on 15 June 2010 the SSIHRL and UNESCO Etxea, in collaboration with the International Association of Democratic Lawyers, the International Peace Bureau, Interfaith International and International Fellowship of Reconciliation, organized another expert meeting on the codification of human rights peace. The reports of these meetings are available on www.aedidh.org

[3]     Conferences and expert meetings have already taken place in the following places: Bilbao and Geneva (November 2006); Mexico (December 2006); Bogotá, Barcelona and Addis Ababa (March 2007); Caracas and Santo Domingo (April 2007); Morelia, Mexico (12 May 2007), Bogotá (12 May 2007), Oviedo and Santa Fe (New Mexico, USA, 16-17 May 2007); Washington (14 June 2007) , Nairobi (15 June 2007), Geneva (28 June 2007); Feldkirch (Austria, 31 August 2007); Geneva (11, 12 and 21 September 2007), Luarca (28 September 2007); Madrid (23 October 2007); Monterrey, Mexico (1st November 2007), Mexico DF, Geneva, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Zaragoza and Navía, Asturias (December 2007); on the occasion of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, New York (February 2008); Geneva (March 2008); Parliament of Catalonia, Barcelona, Geneva, Dakar, Madrid and Valencia (April 2008); Rome and Gwangju, Republic of Korea (May 2008); Geneva and Bilbao (June 2008); Cartagena, Spain, and Geneva (July 2008); Paris, Geneva and Montevideo (September 2008); Oviedo, Turin, New York and Basque Parliament, Vitoria (October 2008); La Plata and Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Bosco Marengo, Italy (November 2008); Luxembourg, Geneva and Barcelona (December 2008); Geneva and Barcelona (January 2009); Yaoundé, Cameroon (February 2009); Figaredo, Asturias, Geneva and New York (March 2009); Johannesburg, Seville, Madrid, Santiago de Compostela and Bangkok (April 2009); Trevi, Italy, Mexico and Seville (May 2009); Geneva (June 2009); Mexico City and Morelia (July 2009); Donostia-San Sebastián (August 2009); Geneva and Valdes (September 2009), Case, Cangas de Onis, Alcala de Henares and Sarajevo (October 2009); Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, University of Berkeley (USA) and Geneva (November 2009); Alexandria, Egypt (with IPS) and Geneva (December 2009); Havana, Cuba and Geneva (January 2010); Geneva (Switzerland) and Bilbao (Spain) (February 2010); Geneva (Switzerland) and New York (USA) (March 2010); Mexico City, April 2010, New York (USA) and Madrid (Chamber of Deputies) (May 2010); Barcelona, Ginebra, Santiago de Compostela and Kampala (Ouganda), (June 2010); Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (July 2010); Geneva, Montevideo (Uruguay) and Buenos Aires (Argentina) (August 2010). For more information on these meetings, please see  http://www.aedidh.org

[4]     The full text of the Bilbao Declaration can be consulted in several languages in http://www.aedidh.org

 

[5]     The full text of the Barcelona Declaration can be consulted in several languages in http://www.aedidh.org

[6]     The Congress will be organised at the occasion of the "Forum 2010" (World Social Forum on Education for Peace), to be held on 7-13 December 2010 in Santiago de Compostela (Spain)  http://www.foro2010.org

[7]     Human Rights Council res. 6/3 of 27 September 2007, and para. 1 of the resolution 12/9 of 1st October 2009. Cfr. VILLÁN DURÁN, Carlos: “The human right to peace in the work of the Human Rights Council”, in VILLÁN DURÁN (C.) and FALEH PÉREZ (C.) (Editors), Regional Contributions for a Universal Declaration on the Human Right to Peace. Luarca, SSIHRL, July 2010, pp. 267-293, at 276-277

[8]     Paragraph 4 of the resolution 6/3, cit., paragraph 5 of the HR Council resolution 9/2 of 24 September 2008 and paragraph 6 of the resolution 12/9, cit

[9]     Paragraph 5 of the resolution 6/3, cit.

[10]    Ibidem, paragraph 7

[11]    Paragraph 7 of the resolution. 9/2, cit. and paragraph 8 of the res. 12/9, cit.

[12]    Doc. A/HRC/12/27, 22 July 2009, p. 2

[13]    Doc. A/HRC/15/32, 5 July 2010, paragraph 40

[14]    Ibidem, paragraph 58

[15]    Ibidem, paragraph 61

[16]    Resolution 11/4 of 17 June 2009, preamble

[17]    Doc. a/hrc/14/38 of 17 March 2010, 16 p.

[18]    A/HRC/13/NGO/89 of 25 February 2010

[19]    Last preambular paragraph of the res. 14/3 cit.

[20]    Ibídem id., operative § 15.

[21]    Preambular §  15, 18 and 20 of resolution 14/3, which restated same paragraphs of resolution 11/4 of 2009, as discussed above.

[22]    A/HRC/13/NGO/89 of 25 February 2010, cit.

[23]    All civil society above mentioned reports and declarations are available on www.aedidh.org